April 2021 Makerbox Everything print results

Makerbox Everything April 2021.

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A couple of weeks ago I received the latest Makerbox Everything subscription box. I had actually just finished my March batch of samples, so I waited a couple of weeks to do these prints. Just like every month, this month contained four easy filaments and four more experimental filaments. This post will briefly look at the results of these filaments.

Makerbox Easy prints

Push Plastic filament samples.

This month’s easy filaments came from Push Plastic. Their American-made filament is very easy to print and comes in some pretty cool colors. The samples provided were also about 5g more than typically offered in this box. That was a nice little bonus.

The four colors included in this pack were: Metallic Silver, Magenta, Teal, and Light Grey. All of these are great colors. I think Metallic Silver would be a great color to make a Mando Helmet.

The sheet that came with the filament had the following print recommendations:

  • Hotend Temp: 190-220C
  • Bed Temp: 0-60C
  • Speed: 30-90mm/s

Oddly, I noticed their website recommends a hotend temp of 205-225C.

I printed a temp tower for each color in five-degree increments between 200-220C. I printed all four samples on my Ender 3 Pro with a stock hotend and PEI coated glass bed. The bed temp was 60C. All of the temp towers printed great. The one below that looks incomplete is that way because of the printer being bumped while working on a neighboring printer.

Here is a look at the samples printed:

Push Plastic test prints.

The samples were all scaled versions of tikis created by Hex3D. Since the temp towers were all good the whole way, I decided to print the tikis at 210C. All of the tikis printed perfectly. They were printed at both .12mm and .16mm. The filament handled both layer heights with no problems. The picture doesn’t show it well, but the tiny cracks going through the tikis look perfect.

The PLA from Push Plastic is one to keep in mind for easy printed and a cool selection of unique colors.

Makerbox Explorer Prints

Three of this month’s explorer filaments recommended a hardened nozzle. So, I printed all four using my steel nozzle from Micro Swiss.

ePA-GF from eSUN

First up is ePA-GF from eSUN. This filament is nylon which has been reinforced with glass fibers. This is supposed to make the filament very durable. More interestingly, it is also documented to be resistant to temp distortion up to 120C. If that claim is valid, it would be an excellent filament for outdoor industrial use.

The recommended print settings for ePA-GF were:

  • Hotend Temp: 240-260C
  • Bed Temp: 80C
  • Speed: not listed
  • Cooling: None
  • Other: Gluestick and hardened nozzle

I printed a temp tower using the above settings in five-degree increments from 240-260C. There were printed on my Ender 5 Plus with a Micro Swiss all-metal hotend. The tower sides printed nicely. There was some spider webbing at the back of the tower where the nozzle travels through the air. But the two towers were very tough and printed nicely.

I did print a couple of retraction towers (only one pictured). I could not get rid of the stringing. But since the sample was so small, I decided not to waste more time with towers. I went on to print a couple of tikis from Hex3D at a temp of 250C.

ePA-GF from eSUN

The tikis printed quite well. The only problem was towards the top of the model, where supports were required. There was stringing between the supports and model. Plus, those supports were hard as heck to get off. Overall I would say this was a suitable filament. But if I come across this filament again, I will spend more time working on stringing issues I had.

Glow in the Dark Rainbow PLA from Hello3D

Up next is a fun Glow in the Dark Rainbow PLA from Hello3D. The product claims to change colors about every five to six meters. That should have left about three colors on my sample. But when I tried it, all I got was glow in the dark green. It was a very cool green, though.

The recommended print settings for Glow in the Dark Rainbow PLA were:

  • Hotend Temp: 190-220C
  • Bed Temp: Room-70C
  • Speed: Not listed
  • Cooling: Yes
  • Other: Hardened nozzle

I printed a temp tower using the above settings in five-degree increments from 200-220C. The first tower had a lot of spiderwebbing at the back of the tower, but the side towers printed quite nicely. I noticed my fan had been left off. I reprinted the tower with the fan on, and it printed nicely, and no spiderwebbing at the back of the tower.

I also printed a tiki using the filament at 210C. In the picture below, it is hard to see the details. This filament prints the smooth parts very nicely. But it seems to have problems with fine detail work. As mentioned before, it does glow green in the dark. I cannot get a picture of it glowing, as my current camera setup does not work well in the dark.

Glow in the Dark Rainbow PLA from Hello3D

This was a nice enough filament. I was somewhat disappointed in not having multiple colors glow for me. Maybe I’ll get to see this in action at a later date with various colors glowing as expected.

Carbon Fiber PETG from atomic Filament

Next, I printed Smoke Blue Carbon Fiber PETG from atomic Filament. This filament appears to be aimed at commercial and industrial cases that need prints that look and act like authentic professional parts.

The recommended print settings for Carbon Fiber PETG were:

  • Hotend Temp: 238-265C
  • Bed Temp: 80C
  • Speed: Not listed
  • Cooling: None to low
  • Other: Hardened nozzle

I printed a temp tower using the above settings in five-degree increments from 240-260C on my Ender 5 Plus with the Micro Swiss all-metal hotend. The cooling was set to none. The temp tower printed very nicely. I noticed only a few tiny strings on the back of the tower. It also seemed very sturdy when I tried to bend the towers.

As a test, I chose to print the base for an Alien3D project (post coming soon). The base printed quite nicely. The legs are solid, making it an excellent choice to use for parts such as this. There was a tiny bit of stringing in the hole inside the base. If I spent more time with this filament, I could get that little bit of stringing worked out. I also printed another tiki. It printed pretty nicely.

Carbon Fiber PETG from atomic Filament

This is a filament I wouldn’t mind getting more of for creating cases I use in electronics projects. The filament has a nice mixture of durability and eye candy.

Recycled PETG from IC3D

Last but not least is Transparent Blue Razz Recycled PETG from IC3D. I liked this filament because it came with a handy reference card with recommended print settings and uses. I wish all filament samples came with them. A huge hat-tip to IC3D for the card!

The recommended print settings for Carbon Fiber PETG were:

  • Hotend Temp: 210-230C
  • Bed Temp: 70C
  • Speed: Not listed
  • Cooling: Off or low
  • Other: Glue stick if using PEI sheet

I printed a temp tower using the above settings in five-degree increments from 215-235C using my Ender 5 Plus with a Micro Swiss all-metal hotend. I printed five degrees hotter than usual because 210C with my all-metal hotend seemed too low to print PETG. The tower printed quite nicely. The bridging was a little rough towards the back on a few layers. But they were all strong. I chose no cooling, and I think I accidentally turned off bridge cooling doing so. That probably would have fixed that.

Now that I look at the handy card, it said to keep cooling on. I should have paid more attention to that handy little card!

As a test print, I printed a scaled-down version of a mug from Hex3D. This printed quite nicely. There was some occasional slight stringing. But that could easily be worked out. It printed nicely at 225C.

Recycled PETG from IC3D

I probably will add this to my list of PETG to buy. About half of my prints are done via PETG. And almost all of the PETG I’ve bought recently is from sources that use recycled materials.

Timelapse of the day

Today’s timelapse is a Predator Mug designed by Hex3D. This was printed on my Ender 3 Pro using Black PLA+ from III3 Max.

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