Print results from Makerbox 14

Makerbox Everything 14

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Back in August of 2021, I received my Makerbox Everything subscription. Finally, I’m getting closer to being caught up on subscription boxes! The Everything box includes four easy-to-print filaments (Makerbox Easy) alongside four more advanced filaments (Makerbox Explorer).

Makerbox Easy Prints

XXX PLA samples.

Printed Solid provided four samples of Jessie PLA for the Makerbox Easy filaments. I’ve printed samples of Jessie PLA many times in the past. I have always found it to be easy to print. Plus, they have some dang cool colors (and color names).

The four colors included in the Makerbox Easy collection are Green Ice, Tan 64, Neon Pink, and Blood Red Light.

The recommended print settings for this filament are:

  • Hotend Temp: 200-240C
  • Bed Temp: 0-60C
  • Speed: 30-90mm/s
  • Cooling: 100%

I printed all four samples on Ender 3 V2’s with stock hotends. I printed the temp towers in a range of 210C to 240C. The test models were all printed at the height of .16 mm. The temp towers were all sliced using CURA, while the test models were sliced using PrusaSlicer.

Below is the print result from the Green Ice. The temp tower printed quite nicely, with only the top bridge being a little bit rough. The cool thing about this particular translucent filament is that it has almost a PETG sheen. Rober Rollin designed the Green Lantern model. StarWars3D designed the Boba Fett Ornament. Both models came out great. The nice sheen coming off the models makes them look almost like green glass.

Green Ice Jessie PLA.

Up next is Tan 64 Jessie PLA. The color of tan is a little darker than pictured below, but I wanted to show how smooth this printed. The temp tower was almost perfect, with a slight string and bump on the top bridge. A King Eddie model by Hex3D was used to test the filament. StarWars3D designed the Grogu Ornament. Both models printed perfectly. The supports under the King Eddie chin came off easily.

Tan 64 Jessie PLA

Neon Pink Jessie PLA was up next. The picture below shows the filament a little lighter than in real life. But the picture shows how well the models were printed. The temp tower printed quite nicely. There was some very slight stringing at the bottom of the tower. The Litte Pony model designed by Rober Rollin printed nicely as well. There do seem to be layer lines showing up in the model below. After printing the model, I discovered a tiny bit of shifting in the 3D printer bed. I tightened up the eccentric nut, and prints since then have been fine. Even with that bit of layer line showing up, I am pretty pleased with this model and how lovely this shade of pink looks.

Neon Pink Jessie PLA

Up last for the Makerbox Easy selection is Blood Red Jessie PLA. This is probably my favorite shade of red ever printed. It has a nice deep red color, with small amounts of glitter going on. The temp tower printed nicely with only a few tiny strings on the back of the tower. The Santa model created by Chaos Core Tech printed beautifully. The model printed so nicely that the only post-processing I had to do was remove the supports.

Blood Red Jessie PLA

As I noted earlier, I’ve had good luck with Jessie PLA in the past. My experience this time was just as good as before. This is a filament to keep on the list of filaments worth using, especially when a model has to look good without painting.

Makerbox Explorer Prints

Makerbox Explorer samples.

Included in each Makerbox are the Explorer filament samples. Explorer contains samples of various filament types from a variety of manufacturers. I usually determine whether a filament is suitable for use in upcoming projects from these samples.

The Makerbox 14 Explorer lineup gave me a great sampling of filaments I had never printed before. I printed the PETG and ASA samples using an enclosed Ender 3 Pro with a stock hotend. The TPU and PLA samples were printed using an Ender 3 V2 with a stock hotend.

The test models were all printed at the height of .16 mm. The temp towers were all sliced using CURA, while the test models were sliced using either CURA or PrusaSlicer.

Black UV-PETG from IC3D

Up first in the Explorer selection is Black UV-PETG from IC3D. I often use PETG for cosplay items. In particular, I like to print Ghostbusters gear. According to the IC3D website, this filament should retain its structure qualities after several years of UV exposure. So the thought of having extra UV protection for my Ghostbusters gear while in parades is quite promising.

The recommended print settings for this filament are:

  • Hotend Temp: 240-270C
  • Bed Temp: 70C
  • Speed: Not Listed
  • Cooling: Not Listed

I printed the temp tower in a range from 240-260C (the max for the Ender 3). I had the bed temp at 80 C, mainly because I used my standard PETG temp tower. The temp tower printed very nicely, with the bottom bridge almost perfect.

I should note the print came out darker than the pictures below show. However, I chose this picture because it showed how nicely the models printed.

Black UV-PETG from IC3D

I printed parts to a Ghostbusters Pack V-Hook provided by Q. I chose to print them at a temp of 240C. The hook set printed perfectly. I will probably use this exact print for one of the builds I am currently doing.

Fluorescent Green PLA from Push Plastic

Next is Fluorescent Green PLA from Push Plastic. Push Plastic is another manufacturer I’ve tried filament samples for in the past and had very good luck printing.

The recommended print settings for this filament are:

  • Hotend Temp: 205-225C
  • Bed Temp: 0-60C
  • Speed: Not Listed
  • Cooling: 100%

I printed the temp tower in a range from 205-225C. The temp tower printed very nicely, with a few slight strings on the back of the tower. The middle bridge printed the best.

The picture below shows the model a little less yellow than it is in real life. But I wanted to keep this picture as it was taken to show off how smoothly the filament printed.

Fluorescent Green PLA from Push Plastic

The alien ship was designed by Rober Rollin. The temp tower and model printed almost perfectly. I will keep this one in mind when looking for an excellent fluorescent filament.

Polyflex TPU95-HF from Polmaker

The third filament is Polyflex TPU95-HF from Polmaker. One interesting thing about this blend of TPU is that it is supposed to support high-speed printing. Polymaker makes some great lines of filament, so I was looking forward to testing this one.

The recommended print settings for this filament are:

  • Hotend Temp: 200-220C
  • Bed Temp: 0-60C
  • Speed: 40-100mm/s
  • Cooling: Yes
  • Other: Glue stick if using PEI

I printed the temp tower in a range from 200-220C. I printed this filament on an Ender 3 V2 with stock hotend. I decided to use this instead of my printer with a direct drive to show that a Bowden-type setup can be used with TPU. The towers printed perfectly! The bridging was rough, as you can see. But then I’ve never really tried to figure out or if bridging can be done with TPU.

I chose to print a tire I’m considering using for an upcoming robotics project. The airless tire was designed by Ron_B and posted on Thingiverse.

Polyflex TPU95-HF from Polmaker

I am very pleased with how well the tire was printed. There was some very slight stringing inside the tire, but nothing that is concerning. Below is a picture of me squeezing the tire.

Polyflex TPU95-HF from Polmaker

I pushed/pulled the filament as much as I could. The wheel held up well and returned to its printed position each time. This is definitely a great flexible filament.

Galaxy Black ASA from Prusament

Last but not least is Galaxy Black ASA from Prusament. This is probably the filament I was most looking forward to testing in this box. Lately, I’ve been trying to find suitable filaments for printing sci-fi and Ghostbuster props. ASA has great promise for this use. It is very durable, and if it’s a suitable filament will print on an Ender-style printer.

The recommended print settings for this filament are:

  • Hotend Temp: 250-270C
  • Bed Temp: 110C
  • Speed: Not Listed
  • Cooling: None or low
  • Other: Enclosure and ventilation advised

I printed the temp tower in a range from 250-260C (the printer’s limit). I printed this on an enclosed Ender 3 Pro with a standard hotend. The towers of the print tower printed perfectly. The two lower bridges also printed perfectly. Based on the temp tower results, I chose to print the test models at 250C.

The test models are parts of a Ghostbuster Proton Pack. These V-Hooks were designed by Q.

Galaxy Black ASA from Prusament

The V-Hooks printed perfectly. The white specks in the filament make it look cool and make the hooks look like they are manufactured instead of printed. Plus, these things printed durable as heck. I think for high-stress cosplay parts, this ASA may be my new go-to. I know this filament is a little more expensive than others, but I think the price qualifies the results for certain parts.

Final Verdict

Makerbox 14 had a great lineup of filaments. If I had to pick a “winner,” I would have to say it was the Galaxy Black ASA from Prusament. It not only printed easily, but it creates parts that look and feel like quality manufactured parts. Yet, all of the other filaments tested did quite well. So I will go cheesy and say those of us printing Makerbox 14 were the true winners.

Song of the Day: The Trooper

No way I can print King Eddie without playing some Iron Maiden!

Bonus Song: Another Eddie

Since the topic of Eddie came up…

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