Explorer Prints From Makerbox 18

Makerbox 18 Explorer Samples

Earlier this month, I received Makerbox 18. The Makerbox contained Easy, Explorer, and PETG filament samples. I posted about the Easy filament samples earlier this week. Now I will post the results from the Makerbox Explorer selection. These filaments are typically more interesting than standard PLA or PETG.

Edge Glow Yellow PETG from KeeneVillagePlastics

Up first is Edge Glow Yellow PETG from KeeneVillagePlastics. I’ve printed samples of PLA from KeeneVillagePlastics in the past with good results. I was looking forward to this sample because it seemingly is a translucent filament. Over the last few months, I’ve been transitioning from mainly printing in PLA or PLA+ to printing using PETG. Having a good series of translucent PETG’s to choose from would be great for many pop culture prints I tend to do.

The recommended settings for the KeeneVillagePlastics PETG are:

  • Hotend Temp: 230-260 C
  • Bed Temp: 70-100 C
  • Speed: 40-60 mm/s
  • Cooling 30-50%

I printed the temp tower on an Ender 3 Pro with stock hotend. The tower was printed in a range of 230C-250C in five-degree increments. A bed temperature of 80C was used. The towers printed great. There was some slight stringing on the top two layers of the tower. I chose 235C to use as my temp in the test model.

Edge Glow Yellow PETG from KeeneVillagePlastics

The test model I chose was a Pikachu designed by RoberRollin. I printed it at .2mm with tree supports and a brim. You can see in the picture above that I kept the tree supports on. I did that to show the lack of stringing between the model and supports. Sometimes with PETG, there can be some stringing between the supports and the model. That didn’t happen with this filament.

Better yet, the filament has a nice green look depending upon where the light is arriving. That greenish effect makes for a very cool-looking model. Even the smaller model I printed, a Chewie ornament designed by StarWars3DModels, had a slight green hue that showed up. I will keep this PETG in mind for an easy printing PETG that looks cool.

Silver Metallic PC+PBT from Push Plastic

Up next is Silver Metallic PC+PBT from Push Plastic. Push Plastic also provided PLA samples for this month’s Easy prints. Here is what Push Plastic has to say about PC+PBT:

PC+PBT (Polycarbonate + Polybutylene Terephthalate) 3D Printing Filament

Benefits of this material include:

Superior stiffness/ductility balance
Great structural integrity and drop impact performance
Excellent fatigue performance
High chemical resistance to motor oil and grease

https://www.pushplastic.com/products/pc-pbt-1kg

The inclusion of resistance to motor oil and grease makes me think this would be a suitable filament for automotive cases.

The recommended settings for the PushPlastic PC+PBT are:

  • Hotend Temp: 240-260 C
  • Bed Temp: 90-120 C
  • Other: PEI, Buildtak, glass

I printed the temp tower on an enclosed Ender 3 Pro with stock hotend. The tower was printed in a range of 240C-260C in five-degree increments. A bed temperature of 100C was used. I had some slight lifting of the base, but the towers printed great. There was some fine stringing on the backside of the tower throughout the whole thing. I chose 250C to use as my temp in the test model. If I print more of this in the future, I might do some retraction tests to eliminate the little stringing I had in the back of the tower.

I will note the filament is a little more silverish than how my pictures turned out.

Silver Metallic PC+PBT from Push Plastic

I printed a couple of Ghostbusters Proton Pack knobs from the filament. Unfortunately, I forgot to take pictures of them before sending them out to a friend who needed them. But they printed nicely and seemed quite tough.

I used what little filament I had left to start printing a Clippard valve for another Proton Pack. I, of course, didn’t have enough filament to print a complete valve. The pic above shows it was printing quite nicely. I had it set to 30% infill. The under-extrusion at the end happened due to running out of filament.

Overall I was pretty happy with this filament. If this filament truly is very impact-resistant, I could see using it to print certain Proton Pack parts such as knobs and valves.

Red PLA-TPE from TerraFilum

Next is Red PLA-TPE from TerraFilum. This is an interesting filament because it combines a rigid (PLA) and a flexible (TPE) filament type. The literature that came with the sample has this to say:

More flexible style industrial rubber type PLA where added flexibility is required; ideal for ports subject to more shock – couplings, grommets, fasteners, and clips.

Makerbox 18 bag for PLA-TPE

I’ll admit I’m not sure why I would want a PLA-TPE filament. It sounds good to print TPE as easily as PLA, but I can’t get my head around how the two would work together (that’s likely my problem and has nothing to do with TerraFilum).

The recommended settings for the TerraFilum PLA-TPE are:

  • Hotend Temp: 210-230 C
  • Bed Temp: Not Listed
  • Speed: 20-50 mm/s
  • Cooling: Not Listed
  • Other: None

I printed the temp tower on an Ender 3 V2 with stock hotend. The tower was printed in a range of 210C-230C in five-degree increments. A bed temperature of 60C was used. The whole temp tower printed perfectly. The bridges were excellent, and there was no stringing. Below you will see some damage to the tower. That was me trying to test its flexibility. The bridges do seem to have a bit more flexibility than standard PLA, but in the end, it snapped similar to PLA when I bent it. It did seem to hold up for longer than standard PLA, however. Also, when I tried to break the base, it did not snap; instead, it folder over. So there is some flexibility to it.

Based on the temp tower, I chose 220C as my temp in the test model.

I will note that the filament is a little less shiny and darker than how my pictures turned out.

Red PLA-TPE from TerraFilum

I chose to print a Beast Man bust designed by RoberRollin. I then bounced that model around my shop floor for a few minutes. The model did not break or crack. That may not be the most scientific way to test the model, but it was fun.

Overall I was happy with how this filament printed. I’m just not sure I want to use this product over TPU.

Blue Shining PLA from Capricorn

Finally, there is Blue Shining PLA from Capricorn. What? Capricorn filament? I use Capricorn PFTE tubing on most of my printers. I use the blue Capricorn tubes for any printer I use ABS, ASA, and particular other high-temp filaments. I had no idea they also had filament.

The recommended settings for the Capricorn Shining PLA are:

  • Hotend Temp: 190-200 C
  • Bed Temp: 0-60 C
  • Speed: 40-60 mm/s
  • Cooling: 100%
  • Other: 0.5 or larger recommended

I printed the temp tower on an enclosed Ender 3 V2 with stock hotend. I also used a .6 nozzle for the tower and the test model. The tower was printed in a range of 190-200C in about two-degree increments. A bed temperature of 60C was used. I had some slight stringing on the back of the tower, particularly on the bottom two layers. The towers printed tremendous, and the middle bridge was perfect. Based on that, I chose 195C to use as my temp in the test model.

It is worth noting that the filament is a little bit darker than what the picture shows.

Blue Shining PLA from Capricorn

I chose to print a Mer Man bust designed by RoberRollin. The model printed great. There was some slight stringing in the model, as seen in the picture above. But it was quickly removed by rubbing it with my finger. But the sparkle in this filament does precisely what it should do: hide layer lines. Like Glint PLA from FilamentOne, this filament uses the glitter effect to hide layer lines and create a unique shiny look.

I could definitely see using this filament for the types of pop culture prints I typically do.

Conclusion

MakerBox 18 provided another lineup of great experimental filaments. I probably would give KeeneVillagePlastics a slight win in the end. It printed too easily and had a cool greenish tint as the light hit it.

Song of the day: Holding Out For A Hero

This Bonnie Tyler song had a recent resurgence thanks to the Masters of the Universe series on Netflix. Well, printing a couple of figures from MOTU got this stuck in my head.

Bonus song: Eye of the Tiger

Watching one cheesy 80’s music video brought this one to mind from Survivor.

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